New DIRFloortime Support Services for Families and Professionals!

Hi all,

I am excited to announce NEW DIRFloortime support service programs for families and professionals!

  • Evaluations
  • Floortime sessions
  • Parent coaching
  • Training for professionals
  • Mentoring/supervision for professionals

*****All services may be provided in-person, by phone, and/or video conferencing

For families seeking to adopt a developmental model for their child or adolescent, we provide intake/consultation, evaluation and a home-based plan. For more information visit us on the web: DIR information

For professionals such as creative arts therapists, speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists, teachers, nurses, medical doctors, physical therapists, and psychologists we provide training opportunities to complete a practitioner certification in DIRFloortime. For more information visit us on the web: DIR support for professionals

All programs are approved and licensed by the Interdisciplinary Council on Development and Learning

 

 

 

For more information or to set up a consolation please email me DIRFloortimeNY@gmail.com 

Parents: A Developmental Perspective

Hi all,

This new blog post is written by Melanie Feller, M.A., CCC-SLP. Melanie is a Speech and Language Pathologist and DIRFloortime practitioner. Her post discusses some differences between ABA and DIR via a the parent perspective. If you have have questions or would like to express suggestion or thoughts, please do so here and/or email Melanie.

Parents: A Developmental Perspective

As music therapists and as speech therapists (and as many other types of therapeutic practitioners) we frequently find ourselves meeting concerned parents. Perhaps the parent who is concerned about their child’s overall development or the parent who is worried that they don’t know how to help their child. Perhaps the parent who feels like they have no relationship with their child. Sometimes we may be the first step, when the parent has heard about the benefits of DIRFloortime, and sometimes we may be the last, when the parent decides that ABA simply isn’t working. But either way, we frequently meet a parent who shares they feel a bit (or very) overwhelmed, and they don’t really feel like they have the tools with which to support their child.

Behavioral therapy suggests leaving the parent out of the equation (and many parents will attest to this – i.e. therapy taking place behind closed doors, parental involvement eschewed) unless it is to train the parent on how to follow through on ABA principles taught in session. Following directions and using scripted words to request are frequent goals. Compliance and “fitting in” are paramount.

Therapy from a developmental perspective however suggests this behavioral focus is misplaced.

The DIRFloortime perspective is one that places great emphasis on the relationship between parent and child, with specific focus on each and every individual difference. This focus allows […]

Facilitating musical interaction when clients become dysregulated in music therapy: What comes first, co-regulation or interaction?

Raging ToddlerHi all,

The question of what comes first, co-regulation or interaction was inspired by a conversation that I had with music therapy colleague regarding helping a child, who has difficulty modulating his emotions, maintain reciprocal interactions for a sustain period of time. Here’s the short of it:

This particular child, Peter, displays difficulty sustaining reciprocal interactions due to his challenges dealing with emotional modulation. Thus, his ability to co-regulate for extended periods is constricted by challenges related to modulating his emotions while interacting. Simply put, his emotional range 1-dimensional, meaning that it expresses ONLY in the extremes, i.e., 0-100. Following 10-15 circles or 4-5 measures of back and forth musical-play interaction, Peter becomes “overloaded” emotionally as well as sensorily and withdraws from the interaction in a hypo responsive manner by becoming agitated while attempting to leave the room in a very aggressive manner.

So…what to do when the child becomes emotionally “overloaded,” dysregulated and wants to leave the room? There are two sides or opinions as to possibly work with this particular child during these challenging moments. One side of the discussion suggests, “first, YOU need to regulate the child. YOU can not do anything with him until he is completely regulated and attentive. Thus, stop the play and begin to calm him down. Once he is regulated, then return musical engagement. In addition, musical-play, be very sensitive and careful not to dysregulate him. If the child does become dysregulated, the play must stop again and techniques should be focused on regulated him. This may involve placing him in his seat, or provide some type of sensory input e.g., weighted vest, brushing, etc. Again, once he is regulated […]

Learning and Developing via Relational Musical-Play Experiences in Music Therapy

frank and cimdy4frank and cimdy4frank and cimdy4williampic-2Hi all,

This blog post includes some immediate and brief thoughts regarding the clinical rationale of back-and-forth relational music making between client and therapist. In addition, it touches on the importance of  contextualizing music therapy experiences within a relationship-based framework, as well as emphasizing  the significance of affective-based interactions.

Several moths ago I presented to a group of parents, therapists, and educators. During the talk I displayed a clinical video excerpt illustrating a continuous flow of co-active and related music making between the therapist and client. During the interaction, the client, an autistic 8 year-old boy who displays difficulty in sustaining self-regulation and with challenges in the area of sustained engagement and interaction, sits in his chair and musically participates with the therapist via social referencing and non-verbal, but tonal, vocalizations. The therapist, improvising a short melodic phrase  (playing guitar and voice) pauses the music following the 3rd beat of the phrase. The client, referencing the therapist via a glance and a bewildered look on his face, follows the musical pause by glancing in the direction of the therapist on the 4th beat of the phrase. The therapist interprets the glance as a musical response and “turns the phrase around,”pausing after the 3rd beat. The client again references the therapist with a glance, but this time offers a smile accompanied by a tonal vocalization. The therapist alters the musical phrase by increasing tempo and articulating the melody vocally in a staccato manner. The client […]

ASD, DIR/Floortime, Sensory-Motor, & Affect

Hi Parents and Clinicians, You may want to set 40 minutes aside to watch this youtube presentation on ASD, DIR, & sensory motor given by, in my opinion, one of the best occupational therapists in the field, Rosemary White. Her ability to profile a child’s sensory system, within the context of relationship-based work, is remarkable! Several years ago, I was lucky enough to participate in several 1:1 clinical supervisions with Rosemary. It was incredibly informative as she conceptualized my work, not only within the DIR model, but also identified the sensory-motor processes that were occurring within the musical relationship process. Here she is presenting an ASD conference:

Thanks for reading and watching!

Best,

John

Don’t miss EARLY BIRD Registration for IMCAP-ND CMTE in New York!

Don’t miss the EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION for New York Course (Early bird ends July 2nd, 20014)

IMCAP-ND CMTE Course at Molloy College, New York

EARN 35 CMTE CREDITS! 

2-Day in-person course & Post Course Assignments

 

COURSE LOCATION:

Molloy College

1000 Rockville Centre, NY 11571

Course will take place in the Public Square Building, Room 040 (located in the lower level)

DATES:

August 1st & 2nd, 2014

Read what music therapists are saying about the IMCAP-ND CMTE Course:

The IMCAP-ND Music Therapy Assessment training provided by John Carpente was an experience that opened my eyes to a new way of seeing and interacting with my clients musically, as well as giving an invaluable framework from which to communicate music therapy’s benefits for individuals with Neurological Disorders to administration, families, and staff. I find that I am relating to and understanding the needs of my clients on a much deeper level and that will greatly influence every facet of the therapeutic process with them in the future. This is an extremely valuable tool, and John presents it in such a way that is thorough, challenging, and creative! I highly recommend this training to any music therapy professional!”

Julie Schlosser, MT-BC

“The IMCAP-ND course was career changing!!!!!! After15 years of a successful music therapy career it opened my eyes to a very positive child-centered way to communicate and assess –following the lead of the child. Coming from a school that uses  DIR/Floortime in the early intervention program, the IMCAP-ND method is a logical and well thought out process that marries music therapy and floortime. The assessment is ready to use and […]

The Times They are A Changin’: New Discoveries Leading to NEW Ways of Working with Children w/ASD

dylanHi all,

The times that have guided treatment interventions for children with ASD are certainly changing.’ But why has it been so difficult for folks to embrace this change and incorporate these new findings and discoveries into their work? Do I dare say that politics and funding play a role? Or  even dare say that special interests groups/folks in the world of ASD have certain “power sources” to steer agendas? Or, how-about the thought that folks choose certain research studies to support an agenda? Whatever the case is, the ones getting hurt are children and their families. They are the ones that are not being given a choice, and in turn, are not fully made aware of alternatives and truths.

Why are families of children with ASD rarely informed of alternative treatment options outside of only one way of working? Is prochoice not permitted in the world of ASD? Why is it that on a weekly basis, and sometimes times daily, I meet with parents of newly diagnosed children, who come into my office expressing that they have never heard of any developmental approach being effective. In addition, I would say that 95% of them say that they have never heard of the DIR/Floortime Model? This is generally followed by them saying, “oh yes, I have heard of music therapy, but what exactly is music therapy? What does a music therapist do? Oh, are you going to teach him songs? He just loves the Beatles!” It’s disheartening.

The purpose of this post is not to preach that developmental approaches  (or that developmentally-based music therapy) are better then behavioral. I’m simply saying that parents should be better informed and […]

Following the Client’s Lead. What is it? What isn’t it? And Why do it?

Holding HandsHi folks,

An ongoing key topic when discussing behavioral and developmental approaches is the concept of following the client’s lead. This is especially relevant within the current trends in the research pertaining to evidence-based practice in regards to interventions with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Yes, that’s correct, developmental interventions are now being used in the current evidence based research. In addition, even the current behavioral research shows to be using developmental interventions in their treatment protocols, e.g., Denver Model. Thus, the current trends in ASD intervention research appears to be either based on a hybrid approach (implementing behavioral and developmental interventions) or staged developmental interventions.  Unfortunately, most clinicians continue to quote dated research when speaking on evedence-based practice (I will discuss that topic in detail in a future blog post). All of that being said, the topic of client-led interactions, which is at the core of developmental interventions, is extrememly relevant and draws quite a bit of discussion in terms of what it is and isn’t.

Client-led interactions, or better known as following the child’s lead, is at the core of developmental relationship-based ways of working. In music therapy, it may involve the therapist creating musical experiences based on the client’s musical-emotional lead, e.g., musically reflecting their emotional state, creating music around their musical and/or non-musical action, etc.  Some therapists feel that following the client’s lead means to ONLY and ALWAYS follow what the client is doing whereby never implementing any  boundaries or limits- NOT TRUE. Others may say, “follow the client’s lead only when it’s appropriate.” Appropriate? Appropriate to what? The therapist? Finally, some say, you can not and should not follow the client’s […]

Registration is OPEN! IMCAP-ND CMTE Course Headed to New York and Radford, VA!

frank and cimdy4REGISTER FOR IMCAP-ND CMTE COURSE!

8/1 & 8/2 at Molloy College, Rockville Centre, NY

10/24 & 10/25, Radford University, VA

The IMCAP-ND Music Therapy Assessment training provided by John Carpente was an experience that opened my eyes to a new way of seeing and interacting with my clients musically, as well as giving an invaluable framework from which to communicate music therapy’s benefits for individuals with Neurological Disorders to administration, families, and staff. I find that I am relating to and understanding the needs of my clients on a much deeper level and that will greatly influence every facet of the therapeutic process with them in the future. This is an extremely valuable tool, and John presents it in such a way that is thorough, challenging, and creative! I highly recommend this training to any music therapy professional!”

Julie Schlosser, MT-BC

“The IMCAP-ND course was career changing!!!!!! After15 years of a successful music therapy career it opened my eyes to a very positive child-centered way to communicate and assess –following the lead of the child. Coming from a school that uses  DIR/Floortime in the early intervention program, the IMCAP-ND method is a logical and well thought out process that marries music therapy and floortime. The assessment is ready to use and with practice will become the staple assessment process that I use in schools. Fantastic course! In short, the IMCAP-ND course was mind blowing! 

-Amy Gardiner, MT-BC

 I’m thrilled to announce that the IMCAP-ND CMTE Training is continuing to travel through the Mid-Atlantic Region, […]

Auditing IMCAP-ND Course (reduced registration fee)

Hi all,

I have received several requests from music therapists who would like to audit the upcoming IMCAP-ND course in Maryland. Thus, if you would like to audit the IMCAP-ND course (and do not need the CMTE credits), you can do so at a reduced registration fee. To do so, please email info@DMHmusictherapy.com. For general information on the course outline and learning objective, CLICK HERE.

if you have any questions please feel free to post here.

Thanks!

John