Following the Client’s Lead. What is it? What isn’t it? And Why do it?

Holding HandsHi folks,

An ongoing key topic when discussing behavioral and developmental approaches is the concept of following the client’s lead. This is especially relevant within the current trends in the research pertaining to evidence-based practice in regards to interventions with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Yes, that’s correct, developmental interventions are now being used in the current evidence based research. In addition, even the current behavioral research shows to be using developmental interventions in their treatment protocols, e.g., Denver Model. Thus, the current trends in ASD intervention research appears to be either based on a hybrid approach (implementing behavioral and developmental interventions) or staged developmental interventions.  Unfortunately, most clinicians continue to quote dated research when speaking on evedence-based practice (I will discuss that topic in detail in a future blog post). All of that being said, the topic of client-led interactions, which is at the core of developmental interventions, is extrememly relevant and draws quite a bit of discussion in terms of what it is and isn’t.

Client-led interactions, or better known as following the child’s lead, is at the core of developmental relationship-based ways of working. In music therapy, it may involve the therapist creating musical experiences based on the client’s musical-emotional lead, e.g., musically reflecting their emotional state, creating music around their musical and/or non-musical action, etc.  Some therapists feel that following the client’s lead means to ONLY and ALWAYS follow what the client is doing whereby never implementing any  boundaries or limits- NOT TRUE. Others may say, “follow the client’s lead only when it’s appropriate.” Appropriate? Appropriate to what? The therapist? Finally, some say, you can not and should not follow the client’s […]

Autism & Music Therapy Research Study Recruiting for September!

RebeccaAustismFlyerThe Rebecca Center for Music Therapy is moving into its 2nd year of the TIME-A Autism and Music Therapy Research Study. NOW RECRUITING FOR SEPTEMBER 2013!

Do You Know a Child with Autism?
The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy at Molloy College is recruiting children with
autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to participate in a research study investigating
developmental trajectories and intervention. The main focus of the study is to discover
whether music therapy is an effective early intervention for children with ASD.
This study is the first well-controlled effectiveness study and largest randomized
controlled trial on clinical interventions for autism to date. It is funded by the Research
Council of Norway and builds upon a collaboration of seven countries worldwide.
This study will include no-cost sessions and comprehensive diagnostic and cognitive
assessments.

Who is Eligible?
• Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder
• Between the ages of 4 and 7 years old
• Limited or no music therapy experience

The study is being conducted at The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy at Molloy College.
If you have any questions or if you would like to consider your child to participate in the study
please contact Laura DeGennaro ldegennaro@molloy.edu or Dr. John
Carpente, USA Research Site Manager at jcarpente@molloy.edu

Click here for a downloadabe PDF of research details

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Stay tuned for updates on future research, publication updates, and upcoming presentations at Weill Cornell Ctr for Autism, ICDL/DIR International Conference, Rebecca Ctr for Music Therapy 1-day Sym, and AMTA!

Thanks so much for reading!

Musically,

John

FacebookDevelopmental Music Health

Twitter: DrJohnMTBC

New Assessment Publication: IMCAP-ND: A Clinical Manual

Website:  www.DMHmusictherapy.com

AUTISM RESEARCH STUDY AT THE REBECCA CENTER

    International TIME-A Research Team in Bergen, Norway

AUTISM RESEARCH STUDY AT THE REBECCA CENTER  IN NEW YORK

  Do You Know a Child with Autism?

The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy at Molloy College is recruiting children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to participate in a research study investigating developmental trajectories and effectiveness of interventions. The main purpose of the study is to discover whether music therapy is an effective early intervention for children with ASD.

This study is the first well-controlled effectiveness study and largest randomized controlled trial on clinical interventions for autism to date. It is funded by the Research Council of Norway and builds upon a collaboration of seven countries worldwide. The Rebecca Center is the USA site for this study.

This study will include no-cost sessions and comprehensive diagnostic and cognitive assessments.

Who is Eligible?
• Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder
• Between the ages of 4 and 7 years old
• Limited or no previous music therapy experience

The study is being conducted at The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy at Molloy College in Rockville Centre NY. If you have any questions or if you would like to consider your child to participate in the study, please contact Dr. John Carpente, Research Site Manager email: jcarpente@molloy.edu

Below are the collaborating countries and research site managers:

If you have any questions concerning the overall project please contact:

Principal investigator: Christian Gold (christian.gold@uni.no)

Project coordinator: Karin Mössler (karin.moessler@uni.no)

Questions related to the study protocol should be addressed to the Principal investigator or Monika Geretsegger:

Site manager Austria: Monika Geretsegger (monika.geretsegger@univie.ac.at)

Country specific questions and questions about participation in the study should be addressed to the particular site manager:

Site manager Australia: Grace […]

Registration is now open for our APRIL 8th 2011 Arts-based Qualitative Research Conference

The Rebecca Center for Music Therapy at Molloy College Presents:

The Other Side of the Coin:  Artistic and Humanistic Evidence in Relationship-Based Therapy Work

 A One-day Conference for Creative Arts Therapists, Health Care Professionals, Artists, Musicians, students, and those involved in the Humanities

Friday, April 8, 2011 ● Wilbur Arts Center, Rockville Centre campus

Conference Purpose and Audience

The purpose of this conference is to educate and showcase evidence-based practice in the arts from a humanistic perspective. This conference is designed for Creative Arts Therapists, Health Care Professionals, Artists, Musicians, students, those involved in the Humanities; as well as anyone who is interested in evidence-based qualitative research in relationship-based therapy.

Conference Description

Natural science has long been the primary means by which to validate the relationship-based therapies. Positivist principles of control, predictability, reduction of people and human phenomena to standardized measures and quantitative variables have long been considered the “gold standard” for appraising the value of any given therapeutic modality. With the growing acceptance of Qualitative Research and mixed-methods studies in healthcare, along with a movement toward arts-based research in health disciplines, what counts as meaningful evidence for therapy involving human relationship has come under serious scrutiny. While certain science-based paradigms have exclusive capacity to validate these forms of therapy, this is not the only viable perspective. Just as medicine and science offer their own forms of rigor in addressing measures of evidence for health-promoting practices, the arts and humanities likewise offer various forms of rigor, expanding traditional views of medicine and science. These qualitative, arts-based approaches, represent a uniquely valuable contribution to the therapeutic community. This one-day event will address these areas from various points […]